Give Up the Myth of Perfect Balance

With age, I have learned that I might be able to have it all, but probably not all at the same time. With wisdom, I have learned that this is probably a good thing. An over-achiever might believe that balance means superior achievement in all aspects of life. However, this belief would probably prove unrealistic and difficult to obtain.

You can't be all things to all people, yourself included. And if you constantly continue to try, the reality is that you wind up shortchanging every aspect of you life. Instead of striving for perfection in everything, learn to sometimes be satisfied with 'good enough'.

Focus on the two or three things that matter most to you. Be open to the possibilities that a lifetime of opportunities really does offer. Periodically reflect on how you spend your time and make adjustments as needed. Acknowledge that your focus may change with time. Give yourself permission to accept change with a positive, welcoming attitude. Fake it if you must. Do not let the fear of failure interfere with your taking risks.

Accept the rewards that result from your efforts with grace and humility. Share your joys and achievements as well as your sorrows and disappointments. Learn from your mistakes.

Give up the myth of perfect balance because trying to achieve the myth is sure to frustrate and disappoint. Aim for reasonable balance for the long haul. You will be healthier, happier, less hurried and thus, less harried. And so will the people around you.

Author:.

Debbie Lessin is a woman of many identities. She is an author (Life is a Balancing Act...a fun book), speaker and entrepreneur for over 23 years as the owner of D J Lessin & Associates, a Chicago CPA firm and Balancing Act Productions, the creative endeavor she founded in 1997. Debbie has always described herself as having the brains of an accountant and the soul of an artist. Debbie began her quest for balance in 1994 - the year she turned 40 and her business celebrated 10 years of entrepre...

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