Manners Always Matter

"Manners Always Matter"

By: J. Glenn Ebersole, Jr., Chief Executive of J. G. Ebersole Associates and The Renaissance Group™

"I have been in the business of 'Business Manners' for over twenty years and I have never worked with anyone who is the perfect example of professionalism except for Glenn Ebersole. I have been engaged in several business dealings with him and every single time he has been detailed, punctual, polite, follows up and is extremely professional. He could easily consult my clients on an appropriate business image.

Glenn is also excellent at communication and public relations. We worked on a national survey together and he was on top of the project at all times in terms of national exposure and contacting me. I would highly recommend him to anyone; you won't be disappointed."

Pamela Hillings

Hillings Enterprises Pasadena, California

Several years ago I had the good fortune to meet and become friends with Pamela Hillings of Hillings Enterprises in Pasadena, California. Pamela and her mother wrote a book entitled "Manners in a Minute," which is a practical guide for proper conduct and good manners when dining in or out. Pamela has been the official Royal Court Protocol Consultant to the Tournament of Roses Queen and Court and has been referred to as the "Miss Manners of the Internet," as she has taught "How to Have Great Business Manners" through an Internet class. And I had the privilege of being one of her guest "speakers" during the course to talk about business manners. Pamela Hillings has been my guide for business manners ever since our first contact.

AND since I strongly believe that manners ALWAYS matter and since I have learned much from Pamela Hillings, here are just a few of Pamela's tips that have always served me well:

Remember people's names. Repeat their name and use it occasionally in conversation and when departing. If you can't remember someone's name when meeting them again, shake their hand while reintroducing yourself, they will usually reply in kind. If someone mispronounces your name, correct them in a polite way.

Be respectful of others when using your cell phone. Go outside if needed and turn it off when appropriate. Never use your phone in the restroom.

Write e-mail like a letter, keeping it brief and avoiding abbreviations.

Always reply to phone calls and e-mails within 24 hours.

At the table, remember "solids," like bread plates, on the left and "liquids," as in glassware, on the right.

Use utensils from the outside in.

Don't begin eating until everyone is served unless you are invited to go ahead. If you're waiting to be served, be extra nice by telling others to start without you.

If someone uses the improper utensil or dish, don't say anything. If they use yours, such as a bread plate, don't make a fuss, simply ask the waiter to bring you another one.

When greeting and eating, be considerate of others and respectful of other cultures.

The perfect wave is refined, yet friendly. Hold your fingers together and turn your hand as if screwing in a lightbulb, add a bright and sincere smile.

If you want to learn more about the importance of good business manners and how you can acquire them, please feel free to contact Pamela Hillings at: HillingsEn@aol.com

Author:.

J. Glenn Ebersole, Jr. is a multi-faceted professional, who is recognized as a visionary, guide and facilitator in the fields of marketing, public relations, management, and engineering. He is the Founder & Chief Executive of the Lancaster, PA based multi-disciplinary & strategic thinking consulting practices, J. G. Ebersole Associates and The Renaissance Group™. He is a Certified Facilitator and business and strategic thinking and planning coach to a diverse list of clients. Also...

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