Stop Saying “Work Smarter, Not Harder” and Great Things Shall Happen!

Agreed it can be more effective to work smart than to work hard, in most cases both are necessary. In addition, "smart" can be a matter of misinterpretation in itself. "Smart" can only truly be judged by one who is "smart" in the capacity and criteria to be evaluated. "Smart" can be ill defined. Nonetheless, "Work Smarter" should remain our dedicated target, we just need to lose the "Not Harder" component.

Through study of human work ethic, it is undeniable that many top performers equate "working hard" with "doing your best." Anything short of doing one's best is less than adequate. Therefore, working "hard" is always one of the goals. Where and how we channel our energies and how we balance and care for ourselves is a matter of personal choice and commitment.

Nations rich in socialism and suppressed middle class existence present global competition of both working hard and working smart in tandem. Those who wish to compete must rise to the occasion or lose the opportunity to fight another day. While the U.S. is not easily adaptable by history and infrastructure to the socialist principles which have been embraced by other nations, Americans must not think they can exist in a vacuum, especially after centuries of global involvement.

Those proven to offer judgment, accomplishment and commitment to excellence effectively draw upon the "Work Smarter, Not Harder" mantra with astute understanding that successful results require efficiency and sound judgment. These toolsets can lead to quicker, easier and more accurate positive outcomes, freeing our resources to accomplish more in the end. The mantra works best for those already working hard. Those, however, lacking necessary work commitment are adversely impacted and misled by this mantra, using it as an excuse to retract effort.

This is an essential organizational development topic to be safeguarded by employee education, policies, practices and daily performance management. The ambiguity of related remarks is polluting team members' understanding of workplace expectations and the blueprint to security and advancement. Consider this both a "call to action" and an opportunity of betterment for organizational leaders at all levels.

Author:.

Jessica Ollenburg is Chief Empowerment Officer and Senior Practitioner at HRS-Human Resource Services, Inc., with global satellites providing organizational development, legal compliance and HR management solutions and research since 1983.  HRS serves employers of choice, with size ranging 25 - 100,000+ employees. Executive, Entrepreneur, Author, Educator and Media Magnet, Jessica's bio is available at http://www.AskHRS.com/our-ceo.htm

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