Stakeholder Analysis

Stakeholder Analysis



Stakeholders are people or organisations who either:

(a) stand to be affected by a project or activity

(b) could ‘make or break’ the project’s success.

When we undertake a stakeholder analysis, we:

  • Work out who the key stakeholders are
  • Assess the ways in which they have an interest in our activity
  • Assess the ways in which their interest might have an effect on our activity.


The reason for carrying out a stakeholder analysis is to help identify:

• which individuals or organizations might need to be involved through formal partnership or agreements and what roles they should play and at which stage

• which individuals or organisations to build (less formal) relationships with

• which individuals and organisations should be informed about, or consulted about, the project

Within the overall set of stakeholders, there will be some ‘key’ individuals or organisations – those who to some degree ‘set the rules of the game’; others might be important but only as major players in the game

One way of performing a stakeholder analysis is to first simply brainstorm a list of all possible stakeholders (some of whom might be discarded later) and then to asign each one to oner of four possible groups.

Group A

Stakeholders who stand to lose or gain significantly AND whose actions can affect the project’s chances of success.

Group B

Stakeholders who stand to lose or gain significantly BUT whose actions cannot affect the chances of success

Group C

Stakeholders who can affect the chances of success BUT who do not stand to gain or lose significantly

Group D

Stakeholders who do not stand to gain or lose significantly AND whose actions cannot affect the chances of success

For those in Group A , we need to ensure that their interests are represented in any partnership or coalition. The overall success of the project will almost certainly need good relationships to be developed with these stakeholders.

For those in Group B, we need to ensure that their interests are represented in any partnership or coalition.

Those in Group C may be a source of risk and we need to monitor and manage that risk.

Those in Group D are certainly not key stakeholders; we should probably keep low-level monitoring active just in case the situation changes and they move into another category.

Examples of stakeholders might be ….

Private Sector

Corporations and businesses

Individual business leaders

Business associations

Professional bodies

Financial institutions

Public Sector

Government departments, ministers (executive), civil servants (bureaucracy) and advisors

Local government departments and officers

Elected representatives – national, regional, local

Military

Quangos & commissions

International bodies (UN, World Bank, etc)

Civil Society

Media

Universities/Colleges/Schools

Churches

Social movements, advocacy and lobbying groups

NGOs/Charities – international and national

Author:.

Productivity is my 'bag' ... it is what I know about. I am President of the World Confederation of Productivity Science -http://www.wcps.info and Director of the National Productivity Centre in the UK http://www.natprodcentre.com - go to this site for some good free resources and some (paid for but low price) e-learning on productivity. I also edit the International Journal of Productivity & Performance Management. My views on productivity and on learning (which I think are related) are su...

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