The Best News

There are many different attitudes. Roberto de Vincenzo, a golfer from Argentina, beautifully displayed one of the best ones many years ago when he won the Masters Golf Tournament but was denied the coveted green jacket. I say he won it because he had the lowest score at the end of four days. But his playing partner who kept the score had inadvertently written that he had made a five on one of the holes when in reality he had made a four. De Vincenzo signed the card, and when an incorrect card is signed, the player is disqualified. He had not cheated, but the rules stood. What was his reaction when he learned he was disqualified? Did he blame his playing partner? No, he said he made a stupid mistake. He accepted full responsibility himself. Now what kind of man is he?

Sometime later he won another tournament. After they gave him the check, he spent a great deal of time in the dressing room. He was in no particular hurry. When he got out to the parking lot, it was empty except for a young woman. She approached him saying she didn’t have a job, her sick baby was at the point of death, and she didn’t have the money to pay the hospital or the doctors. De Vincenzo signed his tournament winnings over to the young woman and went on his way.

The next week he was in a country club. One of the PGA officials told him he had been the victim of a fraud – that the young woman didn’t have a baby and was not even married. De Vincenzo said, “You mean there is not a sick baby at all?” The official said, “That’s right.” De Vincenzo said, "You have just given me the best news I’ve heard all year long."

Where’s your heart? What’s your attitude? How would you have felt under the circumstances? Who had the greater problem – the golfer or the young woman? I think it is obvious, isn’t it? How many of you think de Vincenzo really brooded the rest of his life over that woman who had beaten him out of that check? I don’t think he gave it another thought. He was truly glad that there had not been an ill child. Now that takes compassion, it takes heart, but it also takes wisdom.

A heart like his, one that is honest, expects the best and holds no malice. It is developed over a lifetime. Roberto de Vincenzo at some point decided he was responsible for his circumstances in life, that he had control over how he responded to disappointment, and that a good attitude and a trusting heart offered many more rewards than their counterparts. Make the same decision for yourself and relax into a more fulfilling life.

Message: It's not what happens to you; it’s how you handle it that will determine whether you are happy or miserable.

Author:.

A talented author and speaker, Zig Ziglar has an appeal that transcends barriers of age, culture, and occupation. Since 1970, he has traveled over five million miles across the world delivering powerful life improvement messages, cultivating the energy of change. Since 1970, an extensive array of Ziglar audio, video, books, and training manuals have been utilized by small businesses, Fortune 500 companies, U.S. Government agencies, churches, school districts, prisons, and non-profit associations...

Go Deeper | Website

Want More?

 
New Graphic
Subscriber Counter